Writer Wednesday – Lee Martindale

Who are you? (A name would be good here…preferably the one you write under)
Lee Martindale

What type of stuff do you write? (Besides shopping lists)
Short stories. More fantasy than anything else, but I do, on occasion, commit space opera and a little horror-lite.

What do you want to pimp right now?
Just released in trade paperback (and coming soon to Kindle & Nook), Bard’s Road: The Collected Fiction of Lee Martindale.  Twenty-nine of my stories, including hard-to-find reprints and four never-before-published works. Available from HarpHaven Publishing and Amazon.com

What is your favorite book? (Okay, or two or three or… I know how writers are as readers.)
Robert Heinlein’s The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress
Elizabeth Moon’s Heris Serrano and Vatta’s War series
Jim Butcher’s Dresden Files series

What other hats do you wear besides the writer hat?
Anthology editor – I’ve put together two so far: Such A Pretty Face: Tales of Power and Abundance, and The Ladies of Trade Town.
Nano-press publisher – I own HarpHaven Publishing.
On the Board of Directors of SFWA (Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (2nd term))

What link can we find you at? (One or two please; don’t go overboard here!)
http://www.HarpHaven.net

 

*****

Rejection is the Advice of the Day

What’s the best advice I can give new writers? Come to terms with rejection or find another hobby.

Seriously. If a rejection ruins your whole day, sends you into the doldrums, makes you swear you’ll never write another word again, then you probably shouldn’t. If you react with anger, nastygrams to the rejecting editor or publisher, or long diatribes about how the rejecting entity doesn’t understand your vision or recognize your brilliance, you definitely shouldn’t. You don’t have the temperament for it.

Writing is a business. Publishing is a business. The decision to buy, or not buy, a story is a business decision, one with more components than whether or not a story is good. Perfectly good, sellable stories get rejected all the time for any one or more reasons. It may not fit the guidelines. It may not fit well with other stories already selected. It’s too similar to an already-selected story. The editor has two good stories that perfectly fit a particular slot, and the name of the writer of one of them on the cover will result in more sales. The reasons are many, all equally valid.

If you take rejection for what it is – that this particular story doesn’t fit this particular slot at this particular time for this particular editor – and get the rejected story out to the next potential market with no more than a “well, darn”, you’re in good company. We’ve all been there, will doubtlessly be there again many times. It’s part of the business.

 

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