Book Review: The Hit

Title: The Hit

Author: David Baldacci

Format: Paperback

Published: 2013

How did I start down this path?  My family loves Clive Cussler and I asked my Dad for a few books to try him out.  He gave me a bunch of books and Mr. Baldacci was included in the pile.  I tried to read Clive Cussler but just could not get into it, so I picked up The Hit.  I.  Was.  Hooked.

Right away we are introduced to a scene where we have a man sitting behind a computer help orchestrate an assassination in another country.  When it is time for the shooter to make the hit, the man behind the computer has been shot and killed by the sniper instead.

In the next scene we meet Will Robie, expert sniper at the agency.  He successfully kills a target in Central Park, New York and immediately gets called to meet with higher ups at the agency.  It appears they have had an agent go rogue by the name of Jessica Reel.

The agency believes Jessica Reel killed Doug Jacobs, the man that was sitting behind his computer.  She was a sniper at the agency and started to defy orders and had gone off the grid.  The agency enlisted Robie to kill Reel so they could stop the rogue employee.  They chose Robie because he was the most like Reel, and they went through training together.  Together, they were a deadly force that even the most highly trained forces could not stop.

Robie takes on the mission and as soon as he does the Vice President of the agency has just been murdered.  Robie starts to feel that the agency is hiding things from him and accidently discovers in all the files he has received on Reel, they have omitted pages and pages of information.  He confides in Blue Man, a man high up in the agency, and starts to have a feeling he may not be doing what he should be.

As Robie dives in to find Reel, they end up saving each other on a few occasions.  How can Reel be a bad guy when she has saved his life?  She knows he is after her to kill her, so why spare him?  He was sent to kill Reel so when he has an opportunity to kill her, he ends up saving her.  Why?  What is going on?  Robie is determined to go off the grid himself and separate himself from the agency to get down to the bottom of what is going on.

I am giving this book 4.5 stars, which if you’re rounding up, is 5.  I loved the short burst chapters and the constant action going on.  Each chapter gave you a little insight into Reel and then bam, suddenly the page turned and gave you some insight into Robie.  The book ended on a high climatic note and has me pumped for more Will Robie.  I now have a box FULL of David Baldacci books that I cannot wait to get my hands on.  Tune in next Thursday for my review of Winter In Paradise by Elin Hilderbrand!

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Writer Wednesday – Terri-Lynne Smiles

1. Who are you? (A name would be good here…preferably the one you write under)
Terri-Lynne Smiles

2. What type of stuff do you write? (Besides shopping lists)
Cross-genre novels. Currently, The Rothston Series combines elements of science fiction and contemporary fantasy into a believable explanation for real world events. Next year when the series is finished, I have a number of other novels to be released, including a murder mystery without a murder, a futuristic thriller set on an isolated planet/colony, and a discovery story about a woman who finds herself wrongfully imprisoned. The commonality is that they all involve science in one form or another.

3. What do you want to pimp right now? (May it be your newest, your work-in-progress, your favorite or even your first)
The Rothston Series is what’s hot for me right now. The first book, Foreseen, introduces the college-age characters in an exciting romp into the world of adepts – people who can covertly change the decisions made by those around them. The second novel in the series, Choices, follows the two protagonists on a tense and sometimes terrifying trek around the globe as they flee for their lives. It leans slightly toward horror in some of their encounters but sets the stage for the final two installments of the series. Origins, the third book, will be out later this fall, with Common Ground concluding the series in 2015.

4. What is your favorite book? (Okay, or two or three or… I know how writers are as readers.)
I don’t have a favorite book (unless you count 20 Master Plots by Ronald Tobias), but I have several authors I enjoy for different reasons. I’ll spare your readers my long-winded explanations of the strengths and weaknesses of each and just stick to the list:

  • Edgar Alan Poe
  • Agatha Christie
  • Dean Koontz
  • Ray Bradbury
  • David Baldacci
  • J.K. Rowling

5. What other hats do you wear besides the writer hat?
I was a healthcare lawyer for over 25 years before leaving to pursue writing full-time (meaning almost every waking moment). Writing is much more difficult and absorbing than law. I’m also an active volunteer for a number of charitable organizations and the Board Chair of the Ohio Association of Nonprofit Organizations.

6. What link can we find you at? (One or two please; don’t go overboard here!)
Main Website – www.terrilynnesmiles.com
Facebook – Author Page – https://www.facebook.com/TerriLynneSmiles
The Rothston Series on Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/pages/Foreseen-The-Rothston-Series/

 

 

 

*****

On Reading…

Reading is important for everyone – writer or not. I can’t say that enough. I read about an hour or two a day but don’t stick to any particular genre – I find that too limiting in terms of voice and style. For example, in the past two months, I finished Veronica Roth’s light YA novel Divergent, John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars and John C. Brewer’s international thriller The Silla Project. I am three-quarters of the way through Michael Williams’ literary Trajan’s Arch and failed at reading Brandon Sanderson’s high fantasy Elantris. I have also started Malcolm Gladwell’s nonfiction Outliers, and am re-reading from cover-to-cover 20 Master Plots by Ronald Tobias. During this same period, I also read two unpublished manuscripts – one romance, one contemporary fantasy – and portions of two proposed how-to books. I used to give up on novels that didn’t rivet me to my seat, but now force myself to finish if I can because each book I read provides more insight into writing – either by positive or negative lesson. Nonfiction, on the other hand, enhances my understanding of the world, which then informs my writing. That means if I’m not getting anything out of a nonfiction book by the end of the first chapter, I’m unlikely to go further.

Anyone who writes fiction has heard over and over that reading is essential to writing. This is one of the few “truths” for authors. If you’re short on time, don’t abandon your reading. If you don’t have time to read, your writing will stagnate.

 

imaginarium

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